New York State Medical Treatment Guidelines for

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome in workers compensation patients

The New York State workers compensation board has developed these guidelines to help physicians, podiatrists, and other healthcare professionals provide appropriate treatment for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome.

These Workers Compensation Board guidelines are intended to assist healthcare professionals in making decisions regarding the appropriate level of care for their patients with ankle and foot disorders.

The guidelines are not a substitute for clinical judgement or professional experience. The ultimate decision regarding care must be made by the patient in consultation with his or her healthcare provider.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS)

The very uncommon illness known as tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is characterised as an tibial nerve entrapment neuropathy or one of its branches from its entrance site under the flexor retinaculum, from its lateral and medial ends, down to the medial malleolus the posterior and plantar calcaneal branches, which supply the foot’s arch with nerve fibres.

TTS is defined by the combination of sporadic tingling, numbness, or burning feelings Toe and plantar surfaces of the foot paresthesias.

In the absence of sensory or motor involvement from neuropathic findings, four to six weeks of It might make sense to use conservative care before resorting to invasive ones. commonly used Pressure and pain relief is the goal of the prescribed conservative treatments. These include freezing, tape, extending the posterior tibial nerve, exercises, painkillers, splints, orthotics, and supportive footwear.

TTS does not have any defined, accepted diagnostic standards. Clinicians ought to keep a keen eye out for TTS in patients who come with pain and plantar foot paresthesias that get worse after prolonged standing and walking, or cause sleep disruption.

Diagnostic Studies for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome in workers compensation patients

  1. Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) for Diagnosis and Pre-operative Assessment of TTS Patients

    Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) for Diagnosis and Pre-operative Assessment of TTS Patients are recommended for patients that do not improve with conservative treatment or when considering surgical release after ruling out alternative reasons including polyneuropathy and radiculopathy. for confirming the diagnosis of tibial nerve entrapment at the ankle.

     

  2. NCS for Initial Evaluation of TTS Patients

    NCS for Initial Evaluation of TTS Patients is not recommended for the initial assessment and the majority of TTS patients as NCS does not alter how the condition is managed during the initial while trying out conservative therapy, for four to six weeks.

     

  3. Electromyography (EMG) for Initial Evaluation, Diagnosis or Preoperative Assessment of TTS Patients

    Electromyography (EMG) for Initial Evaluation, Diagnosis or Preoperative Assessment of TTS Patients are not recommended for the first assessment, diagnosis, or pre-operative evaluation of patients with TTS. As opposed to a nerve conduction study, electromyography is often not advised because there is little reliable data proving its value in TTS diagnosis.

    Rationale for Recommendations: It is advised to use NCS for diagnosis. of tibial nerve impingement at the ankle and for pre-operative although it is not advised for initial evaluation, most TTS patients.

     

  4. MRI for Diagnosis of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    MRI for Diagnosis of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is recommended It is suggested that NCS be used for diagnosis. for both pre-operative treatment of tibial nerve impingement at the ankle and Despite being discouraged during initial evaluation, most TTS patients.

     

  5. MRI to Diagnose Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    MRI to Diagnose Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is not recommended for the TTS’s initial assessment.

     

  6. Use of Ultrasound as an Aid to NCS for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Use of Ultrasound as an Aid to NCS for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is recommended as a help to NCS since it might be useful to identify suspected tarsal tunnel space-occupying lesions following ineffective conservative therapy, or as an adjuvant to help direct interventional therapies.

     

  7. Routine Use of Diagnostic Ultrasound

    Routine Use of Diagnostic Ultrasound is not recommended as a standard diagnostic examination for TTS. The routine use of ultrasonography for the first examination is not advised, for the following reasons. Only patients who have failed conventional therapy should have ultrasound exams. Use as a supplement to direct interventional therapy could be beneficial.

Medications for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Ibuprofen, naproxen, or other NSAIDs from an earlier generation are suggested as first-line treatments for the majority of patients. For patients who are not candidates for NSAIDs, acetaminophen (or the analogue paracetamol) may be a viable alternative, even if the majority of research indicates it is just marginally less effective than NSAIDs.

There is proof that NSAIDs are less dangerous and just as effective in treating pain as opioids, such as tramadol.

  1. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Acetaminophen for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Acetaminophen for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome are recommended for treatment of TTS

    Indications: For TTS Pain, NSAIDs are recommended for treatment. Over-the-counter (OTC) agents may suffice and should be tried first.

    Frequency/Duration: As needed use may be reasonable for many patients.

    Indications for Discontinuation: Resolution of foot/ankle pain, lack of efficacy, or development of adverse effects that necessitate discontinuation.

     

  2. NSAIDs for Patients at High-Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    NSAIDs for Patients at High-Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding is recommended Cytoprotective drugs should be taken into consideration for patients with a high-risk factor profile who also have indications for NSAIDs, especially if longer-term treatment is needed.

    Indications: For patients with a high-risk factor profile who also have indications for NSAIDs, cytoprotective medications should be considered, particularly if longer term treatment is contemplated. At-risk patients include those with a history of prior gastrointestinal bleeding,

    elderly, diabetics, and cigarette smokers.

    Frequency/Dose/Duration : Proton pump inhibitors, sucralfate, H2 blockers, and misoprostol are recommended. dose and cycles as specified by the manufacturer. Normally, nothing is assumed to be there. NSAIDs have varied degrees of efficiency in avoiding gastrointestinal bleeding. Intolerance, the onset of negative effects, or ceasing use are all reasons to quit.

     

  3. NSAIDs for Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Adverse Effects

    NSAIDs for Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Adverse Effects is recommended for patients with a high-risk factor profile who also need NSAIDs should take cytoprotective medications into account, especially if a prolonged course of treatment is required. People having a history of cardiovascular disease or multiple risk factors for It is important to think about the benefits and drawbacks of NSAIDs for cardiovascular disease.

     

  4. Acetaminophen for Treatment of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Acetaminophen for Treatment of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is recommended for the management of TTS discomfort, particularly in patients who have Contraindications for NSAIDs.

    Indications: Every TTS patient is in pain. Perhaps acetaminophen will do. to enable the sufferer to exercise or perform more effectively.

    Dose/Frequency:As per the manufacturer’s recommendations; can be used as required. Over four gm/day, there is evidence of liver toxicity.

    Indications for Discontinuation: pain, side effects, or intolerance are gone.

     

  5. Oral Systemic Glucocorticosteroids for Treatment of TTS

    Oral Systemic Glucocorticosteroids for Treatment of TTS is recommended can alleviate TTS discomfort, especially in those who have NSAID contraindications.

    Indications – bracing-resistant tarsal tunnel syndrome. The majority of patients should not be given oral steroids. However, for patients who reject injection, oral glucocorticoids can be required.

    Frequency/Dose: It is advised that one 10- to 14-day course be prescribed oral glucocorticoids rather than repeated treatments. It is advised to write prescriptions for low doses rather than excessive amounts. reduce the possibility of negative consequences.

Opioids for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Patients with TTS have occasionally received treatment with opioids. These drugs have mainly been utilised for a couple of nights following surgery (see Non Acute Pain Guideline).

  1. Routine Use of Opioids for Treatment of Pain from TTS

    Routine Use of Opioids for Treatment of Pain from TTS is not recommended to treat people who have TTS-related pain.

    Rationale for Recommendations: The majority of TTS patients do not experience pain that is severe enough to warrant the use of opioids. Patients who have such levels of discomfort should typically have tests done to rule out other diseases. They should not be used frequently. Opioids are advised for limited, selective usage in postoperative patients, with nighttime use being the main time for use.

     

  2. Opioids for Pain Treatment of TTS in Select Patients Post Op

    Opioids for Pain Treatment of TTS in Select Patients Post Op is recommended restricted use (not to exceed seven days) for a chosen group of patients

    Indications:Patients with extensive incisions who have recently had tarsal tunnel release has experienced serious consequences and whose pain is uncontrollable by other means.

     

  3. Diuretics for Routine Treatment of TTS

    Diuretics for Routine Treatment of TTS is not recommended for the regular management of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendation: Edema or swelling of the lower extremities is not a common symptom of the majority of medical illnesses that are listed as TTS risk factors.

     

  4. Vitamins, Including Pyridoxine for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Vitamins, Including Pyridoxine for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is not recommended Edema or swelling of the lower extremities is not a common symptom of the majority of medical illnesses that are listed as TTS risk factors.

     

  5. Lidocaine Patches for Treatment of TTS

    Lidocaine Patches for Treatment of TTS is recommended for the treatment of a few TTS cases.

    Indications:Patients with moderate to severe TTS who have eliminated all other curable reasons of their discomfort and who report pain as their primary symptom. Usually, more effective therapeutic methods need to have been used in the past.

    Frequency/Duration: as per the advice of the manufacturer.

    Indications for Discontinuation:Problem-solving, intolerance, negative impacts, inability to deliver benefits or make progress after at least a few trial weeks.

Treatments for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  1. Self-application of Ice or Heat for Treatment of TTS

    Self-application of Ice or Heat for Treatment of TTS or recommended for the treatment of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendations: Ice and heat may help particularly with more acute symptoms.

    Mobilization / Immobilization for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

     

  2. Nocturnal Splints for Treatment of TTS

    Nocturnal Splints for Treatment of TTS is not recommended nocturnal splinting for treatment of TTS.

Rehabilitation for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS)

Rehab (supervised formal therapy) needed after a work-related injury should be concentrated on regaining the functional ability needed to meet the patient’s daily and work obligations and enable them to return to work, with the goal of returning the injured worker to their pre-injury status to the extent that is practical.

Active therapy calls for the patient to put in an internal effort to finish a particular activity or assignment. The procedures known as passive therapy rely on modalities that are administered by a therapist rather than the patient exerting any effort on their side.

Passive therapies are typically seen as a way to speed up an active therapy programme and achieve concurrently objective functional gains. Over passive interventions, active initiatives should be prioritised.

To sustain improvement levels, the patient should be advised to continue both active and passive therapies at home as an extension of the therapeutic process. To facilitate functional gains, assistive devices may be used as an adjuvant measure in the rehabilitation strategy.

  1. Rest for Treatment of More Symptomatic Cases of TTS

    Rest for Treatment of More Symptomatic Cases of TTS is recommended for the treatment of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendations: For more symptomatic situations when constant standing or walking are aggravating issues, ankle rest may be helpful.

     

  2. Exercise

    Exercise is recommended for the treatment of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendation: workout routines for It may be appropriate to glide a tendon or a nerve. evidence of increased function and reduced pain.

     

  3. Taping

    Taping is not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

     

  4. Magnets

    Magnets are not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

     

  5. Acupuncture

    Acupuncture is not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendation: Other therapies have been shown to be effective. As a result, it is not advised to utilise acupuncture to treat TTS.

     

  6. Manipulation and Mobilization of the Distal Lower Extremity

    Manipulation and Mobilization of the Distal Lower Extremity is not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

     

  7. Ultrasound

    Ultrasound is not recommended for the treatment of TTS

     

  8. Iontophoresis

    Iontophoresis is not recommended for the treatment of TTS. Justification for Recommendation: Since other therapies have

     

  9. Phonophoresi

    Phonophoresis is not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

    Rationale for Recommendation:Other forms of therapy demonstrated efficacy and ought to be utilised first.

Injection Therapy for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS)

Injection Therapy for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Injection Therapy for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is recommended as a component of a cautious management plan for TTS treatment.

Rationale for Recommendation: Injections are frequently mentioned as a component of conservative therapy and as an additional method for confirming a TSS diagnosis. Therefore, glucocorticosteroid injections may be used to treat the problem if a more cautious approach fails to do so. be useful.

BInsulin Injections

BInsulin Injections are not recommended for the treatment of TTS.

Botulinum Injections is not recommended for the treatment of TTS

Surgery for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS)

Surgical Release for Space Occupying Lesion

Surgical Release for Space Occupying Lesion is recommended after nonsurgical treatment fails and a space-occupying lesion is present, the impingement of the posterior tibial nerve at the tarsal tunnel may need to be surgically released. Otherwise, surgical release for cases with generalised aetiology is predicted to have variable outcomes, and patients should be advised about any probable lack of benefit before considering surgery.

Other for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (TTS)

Orthotics for Treatment of Select Patients with TTS is Recommended – specifically for individuals who have TTS that is believed to have a biomechanical aetiology.

What our office can do if you have Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome.

We have the experience to help you with their workers compensation injuries. We understand what you are going through and will meet your medical needs and follow the guidelines set by the New York State Workers Compensation Board.

We understand the importance of your workers compensation cases. Let us help you navigate through the maze of dealing with the workers compensation insurance company and your employer.

We understand that this is a stressful time for you and your family. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please contact us so we will do everything we can to make it as easy on you as possible.

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