New York State Medical Treatment Guidelines for

Foot Neuroma in workers compensation patients

The New York State workers compensation board has developed these guidelines to help physicians, podiatrists, and other healthcare professionals provide appropriate treatment for Foot Neuroma.

These Workers Compensation Board guidelines are intended to assist healthcare professionals in making decisions regarding the appropriate level of care for their patients with ankle and foot disorders.

The guidelines are not a substitute for clinical judgement or professional experience. The ultimate decision regarding care must be made by the patient in consultation with his or her healthcare provider.

Foot Neuroma (Morton’s Neuroma)

A typical neuralgia that affects the toes’ web spaces, usually the third toe, is Morton’s neuroma. When people have Morton’s neuroma, the discomfort can be crippling. have trouble walking or pressing on their foot because they are afraid of getting hurt.

As the plantar digital nerve splits at the base of the toes to supply the sides of the toes, the neuroma is linked to a disease of this nerve. Morton’s neuroma has been treated with a variety of approaches, including NSAIDs, corticosteroid injections, ablative methods, and surgery.

Considered to be the most crucial diagnostic process is a thorough history and physical examination. technique and typically doesn’t require additional diagnostic testing.

Treatment for Foot Neuroma (Morton’s Neuroma)

  1. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy

    Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is not recommended regarding Morton’s Neuroma.

     

  2. Manipulation or Mobilization of the Distal Lower Extremity for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

    Manipulation or Mobilization of the Distal Lower Extremity for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma is not recommended in order to treat Morton’s neuroma.

Injection Therapy for Foot Neuroma (Morton’s Neuroma)

  1. Glucocorticosteroid Injections for Select Morton’s Neuroma

    Glucocorticosteroid Injections for Select Morton’s Neuroma is recommended Additionally, Morton’s Neuroma

    Indications: a few instances where suffering or affliction are substantial and fluctuating shoe wear, and/or failure of orthotics sufficient symptom management

    Rationale for Recommendation:three maximum injections Prior to surgery, it makes sense to try an intervention to lessen symptoms. Continuous injections are not advised.

     

  2. Sclerosant Injections for Morton’s Neuroma

    Sclerosant Injections for Morton’s Neuroma is not recommended – regarding Morton’s Neuroma.

Surgery for Foot Neuroma (Morton’s Neuroma)

  1. Ablation for Morton’s Neuroma

    Ablation for Morton’s Neuroma is recommended to treat Morton’s neuroma.

    Indications: select instances of pain or affliction wear and tear on shoes, the use of orthotics, and Injections of glucocorticoids are ineffective for controlling Symptoms.

     

  2. Surgical Excision and/or Decompression for Morton’s Neuroma

    Surgical Excision and/or Decompression for Morton’s Neuroma are recommended where pain and/or debility are significant and changing shoe wear, orthotics and glucocorticoid injection(s) fail to sufficiently control symptoms.

    Rationale for Recommendations: In certain circumstances, ablative techniques or surgery are advised when there is pain. Changes in shoe wear, orthotics, and glucocorticoid injections do not adequately control symptoms when and/or debility are present.

Other for Foot Neuroma (Morton’s Neuroma)

  1. Changes in Shoewear for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

    Changes in Shoewear for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma is recommended to deal with Morton’s neuroma.

    Indications: All patients should generally be advised to wear footwear with sturdy bottoms, large toe boxes, modest heels, and soft inserts.

     

  2. Orthotics for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

    Orthotics for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma is recommended for the treatment of Morton’s neuroma.

     

  3. Metatarsal Pads for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

    Metatarsal Pads for Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma is recommended to deal with Morton’s neuroma.

    Rationale for Recommendation: implementation of an orthosis otherwise it is advised to use a metatarsal pad.

What our office can do if you have Foot Neuroma due to workers compensation injuries

We have the experience to help you with their workers compensation injuries. We understand what you are going through and will meet your medical needs and follow the guidelines set by the New York State Workers Compensation Board.

We understand the importance of your workers compensation cases. Let us help you navigate through the maze of dealing with the workers compensation insurance company and your employer.

We understand that this is a stressful time for you and your family. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please contact us so we will do everything we can to make it as easy on you as possible.

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