Labral tear and shoulder instability is usually caused by injuries, especially in throwing athletes and people who do overhead activities.

It can also be caused due to aging, or it may be of congenital origin. Patients with labral tear or shoulder instability usually present with popping of their shoulder joint or feeling of apprehension or weakness specifically in certain moments. They may also complain of pain, especially in certain movements, like in players when they try to throw.

The diagnosis of a labral tear is usually made by history and examination followed by an MRI with the use of contrast material. In patients who have frank shoulder instability, an examination is enough to complete the diagnosis of the shoulder instability.

The treatment of labral tears and shoulder instability starts with physical therapy. Patients are put into a physical therapy program for strengthening of their musculature.If the patients are not able to get better in three to six months of physical therapy, then a surgery can be performed to take care of the labral tear or the instability.

These surgeries are usually performed arthroscopically, and a repair of the labrum or the lax capsule and the bone fragment, if present, is performed.In patients who have a bony fragment along with shoulder instability, an early surgery may be required to [reconstrue 00:01:31] the stability of the shoulder joint and, again, full range of motion as well as strength.

After the surgery for shoulder instability, patients are usually put in a sling, followed by a physical therapy program to gradually regain their range of motion and strength. It may take up to two to three months to regain full range of motion and strength.Patients who play competitive level sports may take longer period to come back to the same level of play as they were before the instability or the tear.

I am Vedant Vaksha, Fellowship trained Spine, Sports and Arthroscopic Surgeon at Complete Orthopedics. I take care of patients with ailments of the neck, back, shoulder, knee, elbow and ankle. I personally approve this content, and have written most of it myself.