Kyphosis FAQs

What is Kyphosis?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is very uncommon.

How to fix Kyphosis?

The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. In general there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment. Overall the treatment decision will depend on several factors of which the most important are the underlying causes for the kyphosis, the patient’s medical health, and finally the the patient’s ability to undergo and maintain the treatment plan.

What causes Kyphosis?

There are several causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the upper or lower segments or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities.

Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease. There are degenerative causes due to aging or breakdown of the normal ligaments and joints that hold the spine’s structure and shape. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries. There are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

Other causes include neuromuscular disorders like strokes, motor neuron disease, and muscle disorders like conditions Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

How to reverse Kyphosis?

It may not be possible to reverse kyphosis. It generally depends on the underlying cause. If the kyphotic deformity is flexible then yes it is possible to reverse the kyphosis. However if it is from a more structural problem and more aggressive and interventional methods like spine surgery may be required. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. There are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it.

The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

How to treat Kyphosis?

In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment. Overall the treatment decision will depend on several factors of which the most important are the underlying causes for the kyphosis, the patient’s medical health, and finally the the patient’s ability to undergo and maintain the treatment plan.

Can Kyphosis be reversed?

It may not be possible to reverse kyphosis and the feasibility depends no the underlying cause. If the kyphotic deformity is flexible then yes it is possible to reverse the kyphosis. However if it is from a more structural problem, then more aggressive and interventional methods like surgery may be required. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it.

The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

What is Kyphosis Scoliosis?

Kyphoscoliosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal.

Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

Can chiropractic help Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that chiropractic treatment helps with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

How to treat Cervical Kyphosis?

The treatment options for cervical kyphosis are quite limited. In general there is only physical therapy or surgery. In fact surgery is the only treatment option that has any long-term data to show maintained correction of the kyphosis. Sometimes it is possible to use a brace to help the kyphosis but this is only in the case of neck injuries or infections. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. The treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it.

The first is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the neck muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and strong muscles to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for acute injuries from trauma or infections, or in children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief neck pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws, plates, or rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

Overall the treatment decision will depend on several factors of which the most important are the underlying causes for the kyphosis, the patient’s medical health, and finally the patient’s ability to undergo and maintain the treatment plan.

How to measure Kyphosis angle?

When we evaluate thoracic kyphosis we do this with the use of x-rays. In general we measure an angle called the Cobb angle which is taken from the first and the 12th thoracic vertebral bone position. The angle between these two should normally be between 20 and 50°. Anything over 50° is considered hyper kyphosis which signifies an exaggerated or excessive amounts of thoracic kyphotic deformity. Remember that the thoracic spine has a normal amount of kyphosis in it. Anything above 60° we deftly consider abnormal and recommend some type of treatment to prevent any further worsening.

How to prevent Kyphosis?

The only way to prevent kyphosis is with either physical therapy or the use of a brace. Unfortunately braces generally do not work except in children or acute injuries. They can provide good relief during acute episodes of pain and possibly prevent further kyphotic deformity after an acute injury. If the kyphosis is the result of an injury then definitely using a brace may prevent further deterioration and deformity but will only be effective for the first 3 to 6 months.

After that there is no benefit of a brace. Otherwise physical therapy and postural training are the only real options for preventing kyphosis. This would involve strengthening the spinal muscles and core muscles to help maintain a normal posture of the spine. These muscles act as secondary stabilizers of the spine and can help minimize the stress on the ligaments and joints of the spinal column especially when there is notable degeneration.

In the case of kyphosis due to aging, an argument can be made for the use of medication to help prevent osteoporosis since this may be a contributing factor to kyphotic deformities in elderly patients. However, it should be understood that there is no good evidence to support the use of osteoporosis medication to prevent kyphotic deformities.

How to fix Cervical Kyphosis?

There is no simple fix to cervical kyphosis and the treatment options for cervical kyphosis are quite limited. In fact surgery is the only treatment option that has any long-term data to show maintained correction of the kyphosis. Sometimes it is possible to use a brace to help the kyphosis but this is only in the case of neck injuries or infections. In general there are only three options which include physical therapy, bracing, and surgery. The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause.

The treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the neck muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and strong muscles to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for acute injuries from trauma or infections, or in children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief neck pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws, plates, or rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment. Replacing a disk with an artificial one is not an option in the case of cervical kyphosis.

How to fix Kyphosis without surgery?

Depending on the degree of kyphotic deformity surgery may be the only way of truly correcting kyphosis. However other options for correcting kyphosis include either physical therapy or the use of a brace. Unfortunately braces generally do not work except in children or acute injuries. They help in children because they can help guide the shape of the spine and the bone as the child bone grows.

However once the child reaches skeletal maturity, braces will not provide any long-term correction and may even worsen the kyphosis because the bodies muscles begin to rely on the brace to maintain a normal position and becomes weaker inside the brace. However a brace can provide good relief during acute episodes of pain and possibly prevent further kyphotic deformity after an acute injury.

If the kyphosis is the result of an injury then definitely using a brace may prevent further deterioration and deformity but will only be effective for the first 3 to 6 months. After that there is no benefit of a brace. Otherwise physical therapy and postural training are the only real options for preventing kyphosis. This would involve strengthening the spinal muscles and core muscles to help maintain a normal posture of the spine. These muscles act as secondary stabilizers of the spine and can help minimize the stress on the ligaments and joints of the spinal column especially when there is notable degeneration.

In the case of kyphosis due to aging, an argument can be made for the use of medication to help prevent osteoporosis since this may be a contributing factor to kyphotic deformities in elderly patients. However, it should be understood that there is no good evidence to support the use of osteoporosis medication to prevent kyphotic deformities.

What causes Kyphosis in adults?

The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis.

Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities.

These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults.

Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis. However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

How to correct Kyphosis?

The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. If the kyphotic deformity is flexible then yes it is possible to reverse and correct kyphosis. However if it is from a more structural problem, then more aggressive and interventional methods like surgery may be required. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it.

The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

What is Cervical Kyphosis?

Kyphoscoliosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side. The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

The cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve. However, when there is trauma or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern. This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine.

Can a chiropractor fix Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that chiropractic treatment helps with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Can Kyphosis be fixed?

If the kyphotic deformity is flexible then yes it is possible to reverse and fix the kyphosis. However if it is from a more structural problem, then more aggressive and interventional methods like surgery may be required. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it.

The first is with physical therapy and postural training, the second is by using a brace, and the third is by surgery. No other treatments have shown any reliable long-term successful outcomes. This includes acupuncture, chiropractic treatment, and massage therapy.

Is Kyphosis genetic?

Although there are some rare types of spinal deformities which are genetic the vast majority with well over 99% of cases, are due to acquired causes. There may be some susceptibility based on genetic conditions and this is referred to as incomplete penetrance, and suggest that even when a person carries the gene they may not necessarily develop spinal kyphosis. For example in Scheuermann’s disease there is no increase risk of developing spinal kyphosis among twins when one twin has it. Likewise the chances that a child inherits spinal kyphosis from parent is anywhere from 20 to 80%.

What causes Thoracic Kyphosis?

Thoracic kyphosis is the most common type of kyphotic deformity among both adults and children. The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity.

Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood.

Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis. However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy.

What is Kyphosis of the cervical spine?

Cervical kyphosis is where the neck region of the spine loses its normal lordotic curve (meaning that it no longer occurs backwards), but instead begins to curve forward (kyphosis). In general we use the term kyphosis to describe an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side it looks like their head is tilted forward and downward.

The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back and turtle-neck deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side but around the neck region it should curve backwards. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). The cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve.

However, when there is trauma, degeneration, or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern. This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine.

Is there a cure for Kyphosis?

In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment. Overall the treatment decision will depend on several factors of which the most important are the underlying causes for the kyphosis, the patient’s medical health, and finally the the patient’s ability to undergo and maintain the treatment plan.

How to cure Kyphosis?

There is no specific long-standing cure for kyphosis unless it involves surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Can you correct Kyphosis?

Yes, you can correct kyphosis but there are no specific long-standing cures and the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Can Kyphosis be corrected?

This depends on several factors. A kyphotic deformity can be corrected but there are no specific long-standing cures and the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction. Overall the treatment options will depend on several factors including the patient and the underlying cause for the deformity.

Can you fix Kyphosis?

In general kyphotic deformity can be fixed in three ways and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Is Kyphosis hereditary?

No the majority of cases of kyphotic deformities are not hereditary. However there are some rare types of spinal deformities which are genetic but these make up less than 1% of cases. There may be some susceptibility four kyphotic deformities based on genetic conditions and this is referred to as incomplete penetrance, and suggests that even when a person carries the gene they may not necessarily develop spinal kyphosis.

For example in Scheuermann’s disease there is no increased risk of developing spinal kyphosis among twins when one twin has it. Likewise the chances that a child inherits spinal kyphosis from a parent who has Scheuermann’s disease is anywhere from 20 to 80%. Since the majority of cases are due to aging and poor posture, the majority of cases of kyphotic deformities are not hereditary.

What is exaggerated thoracic kyphosis?

When we evaluate thoracic kyphosis we do this with the use of x-rays. In general we measure an angle called the Cobb angle which is taken from the first and the 12th thoracic vertebral bone position. The angle between these two should normally be between 20 and 50°. Anything over 50° is considered hyper kyphosis which signifies an exaggerated or excessive amounts of thoracic kyphotic deformity. Remember that the thoracic spine has a normal amount of kyphosis in it. Anything above 60° we deftly consider abnormal and recommend some type of treatment to prevent any further worsening.

Can Kyphosis be reversed without surgery?

Yes, kyphosis can be treated without surgery to depends on the underlying cause. In general kyphotic deformity can be fixed in three ways and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. If the deformity is rigid then surgery is really the only option. Otherwise the first option is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction. As previously mentioned surgery is the only option in the case of fixed and rigid kyphotic deformities.

What is the definition of Kyphosis?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. The spine is not straight but normally curves when looked at it from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail. Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal.

However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is very uncommon. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature of the thoracic region or rib cage region of the spine, resulting in a hump-back deformity.

How to improve Kyphosis?

Kyphosis can be improved in three ways; by physical therapy, using a brace, or surgery. In general kyphotic deformity can be fixed in three ways and these treatments assume that the kyphotic deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. If the deformity is rigid then surgery is really the only option. Otherwise the first option is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction. As previously mentioned surgery is the only option in the case of fixed and rigid kyphotic deformities.

Do I have Kyphosis?

You may have excessive kyphosis if the spinal area around the rib cage region has a humpback shape to it. Otherwise the only real way of evaluating whether you have kyphosis is the use of an x-ray in measuring the Cobb angle. This is because it is normal to have a moderate degree of kyphosis in the spine and only by measuring the angle can we evaluate whether it is excessive or not.

What is Proximal Junctional Kyphosis?

When the spine has been fused or some type of procedure has been performed, the upper end of the construct and instrumentation is subject to a lot of stress forces. This can result in excessive amount of compensation from the remaining spinal levels due to the loss of movement at that fixed surgical region. The terms proximal junctional kyphosis and proximal junctional failure are both used to describe and abnormality at the adjacent level to some type of construct or intervention.

The case of proximal junctional kyphosis there are only radiologic findings of excessive hyper motion or instability. This is classically evaluated by measuring the Cobb angle and finding it greater than 10°. However proximal junctional failure on the other hand relates to symptomatic proximal junctional kyphosis, meaning that the patient not only has the radiographic findings but also presents with pain, signs of instability, or neurologic changes. In general proximal junctional kyphosis can be simply monitored for further worsen while proximal junctional failure will require intervention.

Is Kyphosis curable?

Yes, to some degree kyphosis can be cured or improved but in the majority of cases the only long term definitive treatment is with surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training.

What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position.

However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

What is Kyphosis of the spine?

When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature of the thoracic region or rib cage region of the spine, resulting in a hump-back deformity. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. The spine is not straight but normally curves when looked at it from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is very uncommon.

Can you have Scoliosis and Kyphosis?

Yes, you can have both a scoliosis and kyphosis. However, the majority of patients with scoliosis tend to have a decreased amount of kyphosis in their spine. Since it is normal to have some kyphosis in the spine, these patients have an excessively little amount of kyphosis in the thoracic region. Nevertheless, it is possible to have a scoliotic and a kyphotic deformity together.

The term kyphoscoliosis, tends to mean that there is a crooked spine due to excessive forward bending of the thoracic or rib-cage region of the spine resulting in a humpback. Although a kyphoscoliosis should by definition involve both a twisting and excess forward-bending of the spine, we often use the term to only describe an excessive forward bending of the spine. This is because it is normal to have a kyphotic thoracic spine.

So simply saying someone has kyphosis is not entirely correct. Instead, we often use the term kyphoscoliosis to mean that the kyphotic curve is excessively “crooked”, whether or not there is any “twisting” is not well defined by the term. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”.

What is the difference between Kyphosis Lordosis and Scoliosis?

The terms kyphosis, lordosis, and scoliosis are all used to refer to curvatures of the spine in different directions. Kyphoscoliosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

What is Thoracic Kyphosis?

Thoracic kyphosis described an excess amount of forward curvature in the thoracic or rib-cage region of the spine. The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray).

Can you fix kyphosis without surgery?

Yes, to some degree kyphosis can be cured without surgery but in the majority of cases the only long term definitive treatment is with surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction. Of course in the majority of cases surgery is not required for kyphotic deformities and either physical therapy or bracing is generally used as a first line of treatment.

What is Kyphosis and Scoliosis?

The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature when looking from the side, resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

How does Kyphosis affect breathing?

In general kyphotic deformities not affect breathing until they are significantly high with a Cobb angle conformity of greater than 90°. However the majority of cases of kyphotic deformities present prior to this.

Can a chiropractor help with Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that chiropractic treatment helps with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Can Cervical Kyphosis be corrected?

Unfortunately, there is no simple fix to cervical kyphosis and the treatment options for cervical kyphosis are quite limited. In fact surgery is the only treatment option that has any long-term data to show maintained correction of the kyphosis. Sometimes it is possible to use a brace to help the kyphosis but this is only in the case of neck injuries or infections. In general there are only three options which include physical therapy, bracing, and surgery.

The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. The treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the neck muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and strong muscles to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for acute injuries from trauma or infections, or in children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief neck pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws, plates, or rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

Can Cervical Kyphosis be reversed?

In the majority of cases cervical kyphosis cannot be easily reversed and there is no simple fix to cervical kyphosis. Likewise, the treatment options for cervical kyphosis are quite limited. In fact surgery is the only treatment option that has any long-term data to show maintained correction of the kyphosis. Sometimes it is possible to use a brace to help the kyphosis but this is only in the case of neck injuries or infections. In general there are only three options which include physical therapy, bracing, and surgery.

The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. The treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the neck muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and strong muscles to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for acute injuries from trauma or infections, or in children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief neck pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws, plates, or rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

Can HIV cause Kyphosis?

No, HIV cannot directly cause kyphosis. Instead HIV can lead to certain types of infections that destroy a the spinal discs and bone that eventually leads to kyphosis. The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity.

Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

Cowever the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare, but HIV status means that a person is susceptible to possibly increased infections. In the end, the underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challe diagnose and may require additional diagnostic imaging investigations.

Can Kyphosis be corrected without surgery?

Yes kyphosis can be treated without surgery to depends on the underlying cause. In general kyphotic deformity can be fixed in three ways and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. If the deformity is rigid then surgery is really the only option. Otherwise the first option is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures.

The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction. As previously mentioned surgery is the only option in the case of fixed and rigid kyphotic deformities.

How to measure Kyphosis?

When we evaluate thoracic kyphosis we do this with the use of x-rays. In general we measure an angle called the Cobb angle which is taken from the first and the 12th thoracic vertebral bone position. The angle between these two should normally be between 20 and 50°. Anything over 50° is considered hyper kyphosis which signifies an exaggerated or excessive amounts of thoracic kyphotic deformity. Remember that the thoracic spine has a normal amount of kyphosis in it. Anything above 60° we deftly consider abnormal and recommend some type of treatment to prevent any further worsening.

Can Kyphosis be cured?

There is no specific long-standing cure for kyphosis unless it involves surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Can Postural Kyphosis be corrected?

Yes, postural kyphosis can be corrected. The first treatment option is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. Surgery is never required for the treatment of postural kyphosis.

Can Postural Kyphosis be reversed?

Yes, postural kyphosis can be reversed or corrected. The first treatment option is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine.

The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. Surgery is never required for the treatment of postural kyphosis.

Can you cure Kyphosis?

There is no specific long-standing cure for kyphosis unless it involves surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Can you reverse Kyphosis?

There is no specific long-standing cure to reverse kyphosis unless it involves surgery. However the kyphotic deformity can be prevented from worsening and can undergo some mild improvements with other treatment options including physical therapy and bracing. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training.

What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine. Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position.

However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction. At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace.

As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position. However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Does Kyphosis cause pain?

No, kyphotic deformity is generally not cause any pain unless there is an underlying problem. The majority of kyphotic deformities are painless and simply due to aging. However in the case of kyphosis due to a traumatic injury, then it would be painful.

How many people have Kyphosis?

The exact number of patients with kyphotic deformities is not known. However among schoolchildren is estimated that between 0.1% and 9% of schoolchildren may have an excessive amount of thoracic kyphosis depending on the measurement criteria.

How to correct Cervical Kyphosis?

There is no simple fix to cervical kyphosis and the treatment options for cervical kyphosis are quite limited. In fact surgery is the only treatment option that has any long-term data to show maintained correction of the kyphosis. Sometimes it is possible to use a brace to help the kyphosis but this is only in the case of neck injuries or infections. In general there are only three options which include physical therapy, bracing, and surgery.

The treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. The treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the neck muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and strong muscles to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for acute injuries from trauma or infections, or in children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief neck pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws, plates, or rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment.

How to measure Kyphosis curve?

When we evaluate thoracic kyphosis we do this with the use of x-rays. In general we measure an angle called the Cobb angle which is taken from the first and the 12th thoracic vertebral bone position. The angle between these two should normally be between 20 and 50°. Anything over 50° is considered hyper kyphosis which signifies an exaggerated or excessive amounts of thoracic kyphotic deformity. Remember that the thoracic spine has a normal amount of kyphosis in it. Anything above 60° we deftly consider abnormal and recommend some type of treatment to prevent any further worsening.

How to pronounce Kyphosis?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. It is pronounced Ki-Fo-Sys. It means there is an excessive amount of curvature when looking from the side, resulting in a hump-back deformity. Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic.

What causes Cervical Kyphosis?

Cervical kyphosis is where the neck region of the spine loses its normal lordotic curve (meaning that it no longer occurs backwards), but instead begins to curve forward (kyphosis). In general we use the term kyphosis to describe an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side it looks like their head is tilted forward and downward. The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”.

When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back and turtle-neck deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side but around the neck region it should curve backwards. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

The cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve. However, when there is trauma, degeneration, or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern. This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine.

What does Kyphosis mean?

The term kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. It is pronounced Ki-Fo-Sys. It means there is an excessive amount of curvature when looking from the side, resulting in a hump-back deformity. Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic, or has too much of a forward curve. However the other areas of the spine can also develop kyphotic curves which is abnormal.

What is Dorsal kyphosis?

Dorsal kyphosis generally indicates an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The “dorsum” refers to the back area or spine area. So dorsal kyphosis means curvature of the back. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon.

What is Kyphosis and what causes it?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal.

Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. Unfortunately we do not know what causes excessive kyphosis in the majority of cases. However there are some specific causes which can be diagnosed by clinical examination and diagnostic imaging like MRI or CT scans.

What is Kyphosis caused by?

There are several causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the upper or lower segments or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease.

There are degenerative causes due to aging or breakdown of the normal ligaments and joints that hold the spine’s structure and shape. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries. There are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

Other causes include neuromuscular disorders like strokes, motor neuron disease, and muscle disorders like conditions Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

What is Kyphosis Lordosis and Scoliosis?

The terms kyphosis, lordosis, and scoliosis are all different descriptions of the direction of spinal curvature. Kyphosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

What is Kyphosis of the Thoracic spine?

Thoracic spinal kyphosis generally indicates an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The “dorsum” refers to the back area or spine area. So dorsal kyphosis means curvature of the back. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon.

What is Lordosis and Kyphosis?

The term kyphosis and lordosis relates to either forward or backward curvature of the spine. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

In there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). When a person has lordosis generally means that the either have excessive amount of lordosis around the neck or lower back region, or that there rib cage region has gone into a lordotic shape which is abnormal.

What is Postural Kyphosis?

Postural kyphosis is simply an excessive amount of curvature of the spine which may appear as a humpback shape. Unlike other kyphotic deformities, the measurement angle of the thoracic spine is normal. More importantly the kyphotic deformity can be corrected by simply improving the posture. People generally refer to this type of kyphosis as slouching.

It can be due to several reasons including obesity, medications, poor habits, or skeletal abnormalities in other areas of the body that requires the spine to compensate resulting in excessive amount of kyphosis. Unlike other types of kyphosis, postural kyphosis can generally be treated without surgery.

What is Scheuermann’s Kyphosis?

Scheuermann’s kyphosis is a disease of the thoracic spine resulting in an excessive amount of curvature greater than 50°. The deformity can be isolated to a few vertebral levels or spend the entire thoracic spinal region. By definition, is a radiographic diagnosis based on three sequential vertebral with wedging more than 5° at each level.

Although it is believed that Scheuermann’s disease is autosomal dominant, there is incomplete penetrance meaning that not everyone who carries the disease will have children with it as well. In fact there is only a 20-80% chance that a child of a parent with Scheuermann’s disease will also have it. It is estimated that between 0.1% and 9% of children may have Scheuermann’s disease. Although we do not know the exact underlying cause, is considered a developmental disorder where there is an abnormal growth and development of the thoracic vertebral bodies so that they are not a normal block shaped but a more wedge-shaped.

What is Spinal Kyphosis?

Spinal kyphosis is a term used to describe the curvature of the spine or back. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal.

Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves. In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. Unfortunately we do not know what causes excessive kyphosis in the majority of cases. However there are some specific causes which can be diagnosed by clinical examination and diagnostic imaging like MRI or CT scans.

What is the difference between Scoliosis and Kyphosis?

The terms scoliosis and kyphosis represent different directions of curvature of the spine. Kyphosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side.

There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

What is the KyKhosis?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

Unfortunately we do not know what causes excessive kyphosis in the majority of cases. However there are some specific causes which can be diagnosed by clinical examination and diagnostic imaging like MRI or CT scans.

Who is the best specialist on Kyphosis in the USA?

The best-known surgeon who specializes in kyphotic deformities of the spine is Dr. Vedant Vaksha.

What is the meaning of Kyphosis?

The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

Are massage and chiropractics good for Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic or massage therapy treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that both massage and chiropractic treatment can help with acute back pain episodes and possibly resolve muscle spasms contributing to any deformity, but there is no evidence that they provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Are massage therapists and chiropractors good for Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic or massage therapy treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that both massage and chiropractic treatment can help with acute back pain episodes and possibly resolve muscle spasms contributing to any deformity, but there is no evidence that they provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Can chiropractor help Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that chiropractic treatment helps with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Can massage therapists help with Kyphosis?

There are no good studies showing that massage therapy treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that massage therapy can help with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Can Postural Kyphosis be cured?

There is no specific long-standing cure for kyphosis unless it involves surgery. In general, the treatment of kyphosis depends on the underlying cause. Overall there are only three ways to manage kyphosis and these treatments assume that the deformity is not rigid but has some flexibility to it. The first is by physical therapy and postural training. What this means is that you strengthen the spinal muscles and you teach your body to reposition your head and spine in a better position to reduce the amount of kyphosis within the spine.

Of course, this is not a temporary solution but requires a long-term dedication and mindset change to maintain a good posture and healthy muscle core to support the spine. The second is to use a type of brace to bring the spine into a better position. However this is only recommended for children when their spine is still growing and there is enough time to help guide and direct the spine to grow in a straighter direction.

At skeletal maturity when the spine stops growing, using a brace will provide little benefit and may even be counterproductive since the spinal muscles become weakened and atrophy when using a brace. As a result your body eventually may come to rely on the brace to maintain the corrected position.

However in some situations it can help prevent further deformity and relief back pain especially when the deformity is due to underlying traumatic causes like wedge compression fractures. The final treatment option is surgical and this involves using screws and rods to reposition the spine into a better alignment and this will hopefully provide lifelong correction.

Can you fix Kyphosis with chiropractors?

There are no good studies showing that chiropractic treatment leads to long-term resolution of kyphotic deformities. There is some good evidence that chiropractic treatment helps with acute back pain episodes and possibly muscle spasms resulting in deformity, but there is no evidence that it provides any long-term sustainable treatment or cure.

Could Kyphosis in neck cause hair loss?

No. Cervical Kyphosis should not cause any hair loss. Cervical kyphosis describes a deformity of the neck spinal bones in which the curvature is no longer directed backwards but starts tilting forwards. It should have no effect on hair growth. There may be associated symptoms with sums types of rheumatologic diseases where the ligaments of the spine and soft tissues are inflamed and this may possibly contribute to similar problems with hair production. But otherwise there are no specific diseases which cause cervical kyphosis and hair loss.

There is a disease known as Klippel-Feil syndrome where patients have congenital abnormalities with their cervical spine sometimes leading to kyphotic deformities and they have a low hairline as a result of malformation of the neck region. However this is something that the patient would be born with.

Could Kyphosis in neck hair loss?

No. Cervical Kyphosis should not cause any hair loss. Cervical kyphosis describes a deformity of the neck spinal bones in which the curvature is no longer directed backwards but starts tilting forwards. It should have no effect on hair growth. There may be associated symptoms with sums types of rheumatologic diseases where the ligaments of the spine and soft tissues are inflamed and this may possibly contribute to similar problems with hair production. But otherwise there are no specific diseases which cause cervical kyphosis and hair loss.

There is a disease known as Klippel-Feil syndrome where patients have congenital abnormalities with their cervical spine sometimes leading to kyphotic deformities and they have a low hairline as a result of malformation of the neck region. However this is something that the patient would be born with.

Do cerebral palsy patients have Kyphosis or Lordosis?

Cerebral palsy patients can either have kyphosis or lordosis depending on where there muscle spasm or muscle weakness is. The majority of cases these patients tend to have kyphosis due to their constant sitting position and tighter anterior muscles. However there are definitely cases where the muscle contractures and spasms are around the posterior spinal region this may lead to hyper lordosis, especially around the pelvic region and neck.

How is Kyphosis classified?

Kyphosis can be classified depending on the underlying cause, or the pattern of the kyphosis, or the location. In terms of location there are generally only three locations were we would consider kyphosis to be abnormal and this includes the neck regional, the lower lumbar region, when it is excessive, the thoracic region or rib cage area as well. In terms of the pattern of kyphosis it can occur over a small segment region where it can be referred to as junctional kyphosis or can occur over a long stretch. Otherwise we can classify kyphosis by the etiology, meaning the underlying cause.

The most common cause of kyphosis in adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis.

Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood.

Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

How to treat Kyphosis without surgery?

The core muscles are the most important to focus on when treating kyphosis. Of course there are other important factors including the location of the deformity and the tilt of the pelvis. If you have a posteriorly tilted pelvis then it is important to stretch out the hamstrings as well as the iliotibial band to decrease the deformity. In regards to the location, if the kyphotic deformity is closer to the neck region then strengthening the trapezius, rhomboid, and neck muscles are important.

Otherwise the most important core spinal muscles are multifidus and the abdominal muscles. Remember that stretching of the counter balance muscles is just as important as strengthening the supporting muscles. This means that you may have to stretch out the chest and abdominal muscles as well as the hamstring and iliotibial band muscles.

Is Postural Kyphosis curable?

Yes. Postural Kyphosis is definitely reversible. Unlike other types of kyphosis postural kyphosis suggest that the curvature of the thoracic spine is within normal limits. More importantly it also means that the spine is flexible and that the patient can correct it by simply improving their posture. Therefore the main treatment for postural kyphosis is physical therapy with postural training. Sometimes be used the this is only recommended in children who are still growing.

Is Kyphosis congenital?

Yes there are some types of congenital causes for kyphosis. However the majority of patients presenting with kyphosis, especially in adult hood unlikely due to vertebral wedging or due to traumatic causes. On the other hand a large majority of kyphotic deformities in children are due to congenital or developmental causes.

Is Postural Kyphosis reversible?

Yes, postural kyphosis is definitely reversible. Unlike other types of kyphosis postural kyphosis suggest that the curvature of the thoracic spine is within normal limits. More importantly it also means that the spine is flexible and that the patient can correct it by simply improving their posture. Therefore the main treatment for postural kyphosis is physical therapy with postural training. Sometimes be used the this is only recommended in children who are still growing.

Is Scoliosis Lordosis or Kyphosis the same?

No. The terms kyphosis, lordosis, and scoliosis are all terms used to describe the direction of curvature of the spine. Kyphosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity.

The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

What can cause rapid onset Kyphosis?

The most common cause of a rapid onset kyphosis is usually due to trauma. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis. However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare and take several months to present with a deformity.

Overall in older adults, the most common cause of increasing kyphosis is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine.

The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood.

Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but often relies on additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies to help guide physicians in making a correct diagnosis.

What can cause spontaneous Kyphosis?

Spontaneous Kyphosis generally suggests that there is no specific underlying cause for the development of the spinal deformity. The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in older adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other ‘spontaneous’ or idiopathic causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity.

These can include metabolic bone diseases, traumatic injuries, inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, infectious causes and neuromuscular abnormalities.

What can Cervical Kyphosis cause?

Cervical kyphosis is where the neck region of the spine loses its normal lordotic curve (meaning that it no longer occurs backwards), but instead begins to curve forward (kyphosis). In general we use the term kyphosis to describe an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side it looks like their head is tilted forward and downward. The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”.

When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the cervical spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back and turtle-neck deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side but around the neck region it should curve backwards and the cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve. However, when there is trauma, degeneration, or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern.

This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine. If the cervical kyphosis is excessive it can lead to other deformities of the lower spine which tries to accommodate. It can also result in severe symptoms including pain as well as tension on the nerve roots and spinal cord resulting in weakness or numbness in the legs or hands.

If very severe it can even result in problems with gait and walking as well as visceral functions like bowel movements and urination. However the majority of patients tend to have pain symptoms or even sometimes headaches around the neck region to begin with prior to developing these other symptoms.

What causes congenital Kyphosis?

Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. We do not know why the spine did not develop normally but it can often be associated with other congenital abnormalities including malformations of the kidney, heart, limbs, and abdominal organs. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood.

What causes Kyphosis in elderly?

The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in senior adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine.

The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities.

These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults.

Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis. However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare.

Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

What causes Kyphosis in older adults?

The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in senior adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis.

Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood.

Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

Who is the best specialist on Kyphosis?

The best-known surgeon who specializes in kyphotic deformities of the spine is Dr. Vedant Vaksha.

What causes Kyphosis of the Thoracic spine?

The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in senior adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine.

The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities. These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood.

Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults. Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis.

However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

What does Thoracic Kyphosis mean?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal.

However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Unfortunately we do not know what causes excessive kyphosis in the majority of cases. However there are some specific causes which can be diagnosed by clinical examination and diagnostic imaging like MRI or CT scans.

What is Kyphosis of the neck?

Neck or cervical kyphosis is where the neck region of the spine loses its normal lordotic curve (meaning that it no longer occurs backwards), but instead begins to curve forward (kyphosis). In general we use the term kyphosis to describe an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side it looks like their head is tilted forward and downward. The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”.

When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back and turtle-neck deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side but around the neck region it should curve backwards. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body).

The cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve. However, when there is trauma, degeneration, or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern. This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine.

What is mild Kyphosis of the cervical spine?

Cervical kyphosis is where the neck region of the spine loses its normal lordotic curve (meaning that it no longer occurs backwards), but instead begins to curve forward (kyphosis). In general we use the term kyphosis to describe an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side it looks like their head is tilted forward and downward.

The term Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back and turtle-neck deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at it from the side but around the neck region it should curve backwards. There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). The cervical or neck region of the spine normally has a lordotic curve.

However, when there is trauma, degeneration, or injury to the cervical spine, it begins to flex forward in a kyphotic pattern. This is not normal and the underlying cause should be evaluated to prevent further deformity of the cervical spine. The term mild kyphosis likely refers to a small amount of deformity meaning that the curve is no longer lordotic or curving backwards but has just begun to start bending forward.

What is normal Thoracic Kyphosis?

Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side. Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal.

However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). So a normal amount of thoracic kyphosis should generally be between 40 and 60° when measured on an x-ray.

What is the primary cause of Kyphosis in osteoporosis?

The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis in senior adults is due to simple aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape. As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine.

The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis. Otherwise, there are several other causes for spinal kyphosis which not only depends on the location of the kyphosis (meaning where the kyphotic curve is in terms of the spine, as in the rib cage or lower back segments, or in the neck), but also the degree of deformity. Congenital causes include malformations which may be divided into failure of formation, failure of segmentation, or nerve abnormalities.

These are unlikely to the present in adults since they are usually picked up during childhood. Developmental causes include achondroplasia and Scheuermann’s disease, as well as other types of metabolic bone disease, of which the latter can present later in adult hood. Traumatic causes include spondylosis as well as vertebral fractures and ligament injuries, and these are the second most common cause among adults.

Likewise, there are both infectious and inflammatory causes that include rheumatologic disorders like ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious causes like bacterial infections or tuberculosis. However the infectious and inflammatory causes are generally rare. Finally there are neuromuscular disorders that include strokes, neurologic diseases, and muscle disorders like Duchenne’s muscular atrophy. The underlying cause for the kyphosis can be challenging to diagnose and not only requires clinical evaluation but can often require additional diagnostic imaging and neurologic studies.

What kind of tone is Kyphosis?

There is no specific tone in kyphosis. It can be due to neuromuscular disorders where there may be increased tone resulting contractures of some muscles, otherwise it can also be due to decreased tone and weakness resulting in an inability to maintain normal posture.

What muscle is short with Kyphosis?

This depends on the location of the kyphosis. If the kyphosis is around the upper spinal region then it may be due to tight end pectoralis muscles or abdominal muscles. On the other hand if it is at the lower lumbar region then the iliopsoas muscle may be contracted.

What muscles to strengthen for Kyphosis?

The core muscles are the most important to focus on when treating kyphosis. Of course there are other important factors including the location of the deformity and the tilt of the pelvis. If you have a posteriorly tilted pelvis then it is important to stretch out the hamstrings as well as the iliotibial band to decrease the deformity. In regards to the location, if the kyphotic deformity is closer to the neck region then strengthening the trapezius, rhomboid, and neck muscles are important.

Otherwise the most important core spinal muscles are multifidus and the abdominal muscles. Remember that stretching of the counter balance muscles is just as important as strengthening the supporting muscles. This means that you may have to stretch out the chest and abdominal muscles as well as the hamstring and iliotibial band muscles.

What part of the spine is affected by Kyphosis?

Although kyphosis can occur anywhere along the spine, the majority of cases of kyphosis tends to occur around the thoracic region of the spine. This is the area around the rib cage.

What part of the vertebra is affected by Kyphosis?

The majority of cases of kyphosis tends to occur around the thoracic region of the spine. This is the area around the rib cage. The spine is made up of bony blocks called vertebral as well as spongy discs which lie between each of these bony blocks. With aging and degeneration of the spine, the discs and vertebral blocks begin to change shape. The spine is made up of 33 blocks which usually maintain a rectangular shape. With aging and degeneration, these blocks become increasingly trapezoid or wedge-shaped in appearance.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common causes for the wedging is osteoporosis where the bone is weak and over time results in increasing and repetitive loads on the spine’s vertebra so that they generally take up a more wedge shaped appearance. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side.

There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray).

What the difference between Scoliosis and Kyphosis?

Kyphosis is an excessive amount of forward bending of the spine so that when you look at a person from the side, it appears that they have a humpback shape to their spine. The term scoliosis comes from Greek and means “twisted” or “crooked”. Kyphosis comes from the Greek work kyphos meaning “hump”. When we talk about kyphosis in relation to the spine, we typically mean that there is an excessive amount of curvature resulting in a hump-back deformity. The spine normally curves when looked at from the side.

There is either a kyphotic (meaning it curves forward toward the head and toes) or lordotic curve (meaning it curves backward away from the body). When we are born, we all have a single long kyphotic curve. This is normal. Once we begin to raise our heads and stand, we then begin to develop the lordotic curves.

In total there are 5 segments of the spine and they are distinguished by their curve; the top of the spine has a lordotic curve and this region is called the cervical spine, then the next segment has a kyphotic curve and is called the thoracic spine, the next is the lumbar curve which has a lordotic curve, followed by the sacrum which is kyphotic and the coccyx which is really an extension of the sacrum but in theory should have a more lordotic curve since it is a vestigial tail.

Everyone has some degree of curvature in their spine and this is perfectly normal. However, when people talk about kyphosis, they typically mean that the thoracic spine region is excessively kyphotic (typically over 60 degrees when measured on xray). Of course, it is possible to have kyphotic curves in the cervical and lordotic regions, but this is uncommon. In regards to scoliosis, this term refers to a side to side curvature of the spine when looking straight ahead at a person.

The person can have both a kyphosis as well as a scoliosis deformity, or simply a kyphotic deformity. Unfortunately we use the term kyphoscoliosis to indicate that there is an abnormal curve and it does not signify whether the patient has either one or both kyphosis and scoliosis.

Where does Kyphosis occur?

Kyphosis can occur anywhere along the spine. However, the majority of cases of kyphosis tends to occur around the thoracic region of the spine. This is the area around the rib cage.

Where is Kyphosis found?

The majority of cases of kyphotic deformities are found along the thoracic spine region which includes the rib cage area. However kyphotic deformities are also found within the neck region and the lower lumbar spine. However these are much less common and are usually attributed to an underlying disease or injury, while any thoracic kyphosis can be due to simple aging.

Which Kyphosis diagnosis icd10?

This depends if it is postural or secondary to an underlying abnormality. Postural kyphosis has an ICD 10 code of M40.00. While the other hand secondary kyphosis has an ICD 10 code of M40.10. There are further codes depending on the region involved.

Which muscles become lengthened with Chronic Kyphosis?

There are no specific muscles which become lengthened with chronic kyphosis. Instead the muscles atrophy meaning that they shrink in their size. However the number of muscle cells do not change.

Who is at risk for Kyphosis?

Patients with metabolic bone diseases and osteoporosis are at risk for developing thoracic kyphosis. The spine is made up of bony blocks called vertebral as well as spongy discs which lie between each of these bony blocks. With aging and degeneration of the spine, the discs and vertebral blocks begin to change shape. The spine is made up of 33 blocks which usually maintain a rectangular shape. With aging and degeneration, these blocks become increasingly trapezoid or wedge-shaped in appearance.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common causes for the wedging is osteoporosis where the bone is weak and over time results in increasing and repetitive loads on the spine’s vertebra so that they generally take up a more wedge shaped appearance. Other people at risk include patients with neuromuscular disorders where they are unable to maintain the posture of their spine.

Why do bone degenerative diseases cause Kyphosis?

The spine is made up of bony blocks called vertebral as well as spongy discs which lie between each of these bony blocks. With aging and degeneration of the spine, the discs and vertebral blocks begin to change shape. The spine is made up of 33 blocks which usually maintain a rectangular shape. With aging and degeneration, these blocks become increasingly trapezoid or wedge-shaped in appearance.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common causes for the wedging is osteoporosis where the bone is weak and over time results in increasing and repetitive loads on the spine’s vertebra so that they generally take up a more wedge shaped appearance.

Why to old people develop Kyphosis?

Kyphotic deformities of the spine develop in older people due to osteoporosis and changes in the shape of the spine bones that occur with aging. The most common cause of increasing thoracic kyphosis among adults is due to aging which results in increasing vertebral wedging. As we grow older the spine, which is made up of 33 blocks called vertebra, no longer maintain their rectangular shape. Instead these blocks become increasingly trapezoid in shape.

As a result of this mild degree of wedging within several blocks, it results in a more rounded for kyphotic appearance of the spine. The most common cause for the wedging is osteoporosis where the bone is weak and over time as a result of the increasing and repetitive loads on the spine’s vertebra and generally takes up a more triangular shaped appearance.

Will Kyphosis progress?

The progression of a kyphotic deformity depends on the underlying cause. In general, the majority of people will develop increasing thoracic kyphosis over their lifetime. This is a normal part of aging and can be due to changes to our posture as well as changes in the consistency and shape of the spinal bones known as vertebra. However, the degree of the deformity and severity depends on the underlying cause. It should be noted, that when there is a significant amount of kyphosis, progression and worsening of the deformity can increase at a faster rate.

These questions have been personally answered by:

I am Vedant Vaksha, Fellowship trained Spine, Sports and Arthroscopic Surgeon at Complete Orthopedics. I take care of patients with ailments of the neck, back, shoulder, knee, elbow and ankle. I personally approve this content and have written most of it myself.

Please take a look at my profile page and don't hesitate to come in and talk.

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I had an extremely friendly and personalized medical consult with Dr Karkare. Dr Karkare was very knowledgeable and very professional. His communication skills was extremely good and explained my medical condition in very simple words. The office visit was very helpful in understanding my medical condition. Thank you Dr Karkare
Padmanabhan Nagaraj
20:49 25 Sep 23
Dr. Karlkare and his staff were excellent. Dr. Karkare explained everything clearly and took his time getting to know my Dad.
Anna Acker
22:46 07 Sep 23
Dr Vedant Vaksha had done emergency surgery in 2020 after a traumatic injury.His office at Complete Orthopedics handled the continued care thereafter.Dr V and his staff had been Professional and friendly throughout the process, taking the time to explain all the questions on how to proceed and what to expect.Whenever I needed to speak with Dr V or the office they were a phone call away, without waiting or calling several numbers like in so many other medical offices.The office was accommodating to scheduling to my needs at all times. Dr Vedant Vaksha earned the following5 out of 5 stars, highly recommended.
John Kuey
20:58 05 Sep 23
Dr. Vaksha helped me recover from an injury. I am very thankful that he took the time to explain the best treatment for my injury. Also thankful for the wonderful office staff!
Joseph Castelli
22:30 02 Aug 23
The office is wonderful!… Dr Paresh was very helpful and attentive and made my sister in laws recovery so much better.. Thank you for everything
Jazz Lorenzo
17:48 14 Jul 23
The ladies are very welcoming, the service is great, the doctor is very professional and caring and the building is super clean. I really like to come here, the atmosphere is very friendly... Come and you will love it too.
Joan Carasco
14:41 30 Jun 23
Dr. Nakul Karkare is awesome! And patriotic! Thank you, Dr. Karkare for displaying the American Flag in your waiting room, honoring and mourning our military personnel, this Memorial Day, who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.
Dave
00:52 30 May 23
Excellent and skilled orthopedic practice specializing in joint replacements. Dr Karkare was trained at the Hospital for Special Surgery and has excellent results, as do his associates!! Would gladly refer family members to the practice!!
Eclectic54
00:24 30 May 23
I had such a wonderful experience with Complete Orthopedics in Stony Brook. Not only did Dr. Kuo fix my broken wrist with such kindness and care, but the office staff, including Billing, Reception and the X-Ray Technician, was always so helpful, going out of their way to ensure that each patient felt welcome, answering any questions with a smile, and ensuring any issues with insurance/billing were handled with the utmost professionalism. I highly recommend their practice!
Victoria DeMatteo
19:49 10 May 23
I'm very happy St. Catherine's sent me to this office for treatment after I broke my collar bone! Unfortunately the break was too severe to repair on its own and I had to have it rebuilt a week after the injury. Dr. Vaksha did a great job fixing it. I'm three months out, and I have full use of the arm and shoulder. The whole office staff is very professional, accommodating, and welcoming. I hope to not need orthopedic services again, but Dr. Vaksha will be my number one choice if I or anyone in family suffers such am injury.
Tina Rivera
20:42 08 May 23
No one likes going to the doctor. But these people make it painless. I go for knees, hips and shoulders. At almost 70 Complete Orthopedics keeps my active life style running smoothly. Whether chasing my Grandson and even surfing again, I highly recommend them!!
Thomas Slavin
15:02 02 Mar 23
Dr. Kuo knowledgeable and competent surgeon- very good experience and more importantly great result.
Joseph McCoy
21:23 25 Feb 23
Dr Vaksha was so kind and helpful. He took extra time with us and explained things so thoroughly. Highly recommend. Office very clean.
Susan Bosinius
20:20 19 Feb 23
Dr Vaksha, is a great doctor very professional knows what he talking about. Treat patient with upmost respect. Thank You
Troy Spencer
16:46 19 Jan 23
Dr. Karkare is an amazing doctor, very caring and attentive, the girl at the front desk is very kind and helpful. .elizabeth .thank you so much .
blanca ventura
21:32 26 Oct 22
Been going to this place before my accident and after I had my knee surgery. So happy how I been treated and how well I am getting. Thank you all and specially Dr. VAKSHA for everything and getting back on track.
Ita Opico
19:01 25 Oct 22
Love this place From the minute I called I was treated kindly. When I arrived The Dr saw me right away he was compassionate and ordered the appropriate tests for me. I came back in for my follow up and had the same great experience.
Christine Rostock
21:28 23 May 22
Dr Vaksha and Dr karkare are 2 of the best orthopedic doctors around my wife Susan had a very serious broken ankle in March of 2019 she didn't think she was going to walk again Dr vaksha did an excellent surgery on her ankle he said it was his toughest he ever did he put a lot of hardware in her ankle and told her she would be alright she made remarkable recovery thanks to his surgery as of now she regained 100 percent use of her ankle she would highly recommend him to anyone. My own experience with Dr karkare has been wonderful he takes his time with you listens to what you have to say and prescribes various treatments and is very caring I would highly recommend him to anyone I would give both doctors a 10 plus rating we are very happy with them the best.
Harry Jones
23:31 19 May 22
Complete orthopedics is a wonderful place to go when you hurt or injured a great staff and wonderful doctors very knowledgeable and helpful I would recommend this place to all of my family and friends that is in me of orthopedic care I give them 10 thumbs up
Wayne Pemberton
17:39 18 May 22
The staff is very professional and helpful. Dr. Vaksha is excellent. He takes time to listen and offer suggestions to help you get better. I’m very thankful and happy to be a patient here at Complete Orthopedics.
Phoenix Rising
19:54 16 May 22
Dr.Karkare is the best. He listens to everything and explains everything I recommend him to everyone. I am so happy he is my doctor.
Myrna James
00:48 13 May 22
Dr.Kuo is amazing very attentive,caring,and passionate and staff is awsome too.Thank you for everything Dr.kuo.
Erick Murillo
23:17 12 May 22
I was in a car accident November 1 I was referred to Dr. Vaksha For shoulder surgery . I he was amazing he made me feel very comfortable and explained everything that was going to happen from surgery all the way through my physical therapy highly recommend Dr. Vaksha
Yolanda Ojeda
19:37 09 May 22
My appointment with Dr. Vaksha was amazing. Dr. Vaksha was very thorough and kind. I would refer this office to anyone who needs a great orthopedic doctor.
John Senechal
19:54 05 May 22
Scheduling my appointment was quick and easy. The staff was super friendly and down to earth. I was seen on time. The appropriate test, “x-rays” were taken before the conversation with doctor, something I really liked, test for analysis and conversation was done upfront. Dr. V had a great personality and was no BS, straight forward diagnosis and a play on next steps. I am happy I found them and would refer them to friends and family.
Sam
00:46 03 May 22
I have seen Dr. Kuo two times already and he's awesome along with his staff. Very friendly office and I'm glad to be a patient here.
Camaris A
20:01 28 Apr 22
Amazing team!! Very caring, profesional, and friendly!! Dr. Kevin Kuo, you are the best, very passionate, caring, and helping thank you for getting me better and being so kind to me! Elizabeth you the best thank you for you help always and you big smile and positive actitud❤️🙏🏼
breidy valerio
19:01 22 Apr 22
The staff is truly exceptional, they make you feel comfortable and welcomed. The doctors are amazing,always professional, compassionate and great listeners.
Elizabeth Collado
03:25 09 Apr 22
What a great place! The place is clean and organized.The staff is wonderful. Setting up physical therapy is right there as well.I'm so glad I found this place.
Donna Anne
22:45 05 Apr 22
This was my 1st time breaking something in my 27 years on this planet. I was recommended here by a friend Dr. Vashka helped me from day 1 and still continues to check in on me and my healing ankle. Would highly recommend
tyron davis
16:06 01 Apr 22
Brand new office, same great doctors! Rooms are clean, plenty of parking, physical therapy attached, Dr. Karkare and his staff are awesome. Thank you!
Emily B
02:49 24 Mar 22
Dr.VAksha is the best, I love the way he treats me as his patient, he is caring,understanding and very attentive to my needs
Mirna Caballero
14:53 03 Mar 22
Great staff. Dr. Vaksha is awesome and takes the time to listen to his patients. He is very compassionate. I would highly recommend this office.
Bebe Doyle
01:24 23 Feb 22
After suffering from a severe ankle injury Dr. V was able to help me heal and return back to work completely to a job where I stand for 12 hours a day. The office is very clean and I appreciated the reminders of my appointments via phone call and through text. The patient portal made it easy for me to access all my documents including work notes. The office staff is wonderful and Rebecca was able to schedule me with a busy schedule and awesome at answering all of my questions including referring me to a great physical therapy office. I highly recommend this office to anyone who’s looking for knowledgeable and kind orthopedic office.
Elizabeth Birchwell
21:31 28 Jan 21
The staff here are great, I was seen at the time of my appointment and was well taken care of!
Shaun Berry
18:14 07 Jan 21
They are an excellent practice. The front and back office people are amazing and so helpful. Rebecca is such a kind and understanding person. I had an issue with paperwork and she cleared it right up. Dr. Karkare is very knowledgeable, helpful, and caring.
Matt S.
19:31 18 Nov 20
Rebecca K. - What a true burst of sunshine. Very friendly and definitely an asset to the practice!
Laura Aston
18:17 17 Nov 20
Great experience, the Doctor is nice but the staff is incredible. I worked with Linda, who was profession and assisted me beyond what any person has done at other practices. Complete Ortho should be complimented for having such a person on their staff.I highly recommend this place!!!
Joe Allen
17:26 17 Nov 20
Linda and Becca they are so good ever time I come they are very nice I would tell everyone I no to come to this office..
Barbara Victor
16:45 17 Nov 20
I was rear ended in an auto accident , Dr Vashka was recommended by a friend of mine .I was experiencing Back , neck , and shoulder pain . After a thorough examination and given exercises to do at home , I am feeling much better , and I ended up avoiding surgery . The staff at Complete Ortho is extremely attentive and show great care when making an appointment and are very friendly and i never waited more than 5 minutes for my appointment . So I would strongly recommend Complete Orthopedics for any aches and pains that one might be experiencing.....
Bill Becht
04:44 17 Nov 20
It was the afternoon of Friday Sept. 24. We were in Pt. Jefferson and my wife, Mary Ann, broke her hip. We went to Mather Hospital and it was determined that she would have to have an operation to have it repaired. This would be her third time under the knife in the past year. It just so happened that we were very fortunate enough to have Dr. Karkare, who was on standby, perform the surgery. He put in a rod and two screws in her hip. She spent a few days in the hospital and then went to Gurwin rehabilitee for another few weeks.It has now been almost six weeks and we both worked the election the other day. If it wasn’t for Dr. Karkare’s expertise she never would have been able to work. She is able to walk with a walker and is doing physical therapy three times a week.We can not thank the doctor enough for the compassion and dedication that he puts into his work. It allows Mary Ann do the things that she likes to do, even on a limited basis for a while. I know that with her will, perseverance and the great work that the surgeon performed she will be back on her feet in no time.Sincerely:John V. PlumpEast Northport, NY 11731
Jack Harris
14:36 06 Nov 20
In the year of 2018 I was referred to Dr. Karkare because I was experiencing severe knee joint pain. After exhausting physical therapy and trying to labor through the pain, I had to make a quality of life decision. Total knee replacement was the only viable option. Dr. Karkare made my decision easy as he walked me through the whole process from surgery to recovery.On 12/13/19 ( Friday the 13th) I enter Lenox Hill Hospital in great hands. From the time I entered Dr. Karkare’s office for the first time until now, his staff has been amazing. Andrea the medical coordinator walked me through all the paper work and necessary preparations for the surgery. Courtesy and kind would be an understatement. Dr. Karkare went over and beyond from the wellness checks and phone calls all to assure me that I was important to him. This was the right decision no pain and no limp. Complete Orthopedics should be your choice!
Kenneth Randolph
22:18 25 Sep 20
Dr. Vadshka has a great bedside manner. He really takes his time and explains treatment options.
T Lee
12:33 09 Sep 20
I suffered with pain in both knees for years. My orthopedic doctor kept recommending knee replacement . I fought it for years, as I was just afraid. When I had no choice and could barely walk , it was recommended I see Dr. Karkare. We set up a consultation and my wife and I left his office feeling totally confident and comfortable with moving ahead with the surgery. He explained everything to us, and the office staff set everything up for us and made the process easy. So about one month after our initial meeting I had the first knee done. I was up walking mere hours after the surgery, and on the workout machines the next morning. I went home two days after the surgery, and yes walked my daughter down the aisle at her wedding only one week after the surgery without even a cane! Three months later I had the other knee done and went home the very next day. Dr. Karkare put my fears to rest . I would highly recommend him. His expertise gave me my life back. Thank you Dr. Karkare.SincerelyVito Congro
Ethel Congo
23:58 12 Aug 20
Dr Rhodin really cares for his patients. When I see him he makes sure to review my progress in detail.
Micki Cahill
15:03 08 Feb 20
My mom had a total hip replacement by dr karkare. He is the BEST orthopedic doctor.Her incision is almost invisable.She is going back for her other hip next week. The office staff is the best, love Andrea.You wont find a better doctor.
Ryan
21:06 13 Jul 18
There is no better Orthopedic doctor you will find. Broke my ankle three places on a Saturday. Called Dr. Karkare. He had is team ready at the hospital and operated on me within 6 hours after my injury. Now After 3 months of great care by him and his staff, I am walking to normalcy.
Spacecom Tel
04:13 23 Mar 18
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