Hip

Normal Anatomy of the Hip joint

The thigh bone, femur, and the pelvis, acetabulum, join to form the hip joint. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

The cartilage cushions the joint and allows the bones to move on each other with smooth movements. This cartilage does not show up on X-ray, therefore you can see a “joint space” between the femoral head and acetabular socket.

Pelvis

The pelvis is a large, flattened, irregularly shaped bone, constricted in the center and expanded above and below. It consists of three parts: the ilium, ischium, and pubis.

The socket, acetabulum, is situated on the outer surface of the bone and joins to the head of the femur to form the hip joint.

Femur

The femur is the longest bone in the skeleton. It joins to the pelvis, acetabulum, to form the hip joint.

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), often referred to as hip impingement, is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each other creating damage and pain to the hip joint.

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Hip Bursitis

Hip bursitis is a painful condition caused by inflammation of a bursa in the hip. Bursae are fluid filled sacs present in joints between bone and soft tissue to reduce friction and provide cushioning during movement.

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Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition which is seen in infants and young children as a result of developmental problems in the hip joint. The femur (thigh bone) partially or completely slips out of the hip socket causing dislocation at the hip joint.

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Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole surgery or minimally invasive surgery, is performed through very small incisions to evaluate and treat a variety of hip conditions. Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint.

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Total Hip Replacement (THR)

Hip replacement has become necessary for your arthritic hip: this is one of the most effective operations known and should give you many years of freedom from pain.

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Hip Resurfacing

Hip replacement has become necessary for your arthritic hip: this is one of the most effective operations known and should give you many years of freedom from pain.

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Revision Hip Replacement

This means that part or all of your previous hip replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from very minor adjustments to massive operations replacing significant amounts of bone and hence is difficult to describe in full.

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Anterior Hip Replacement

Anterior Hip Replacement is a minimally invasive, muscle sparing surgery using an alternative approach to traditional hip replacement surgery.

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Makoplasty Anterior Hip Replacement

Degenerative joint disease (DJD), a common cause of hip pain, is a chronic condition hampering the quality of life of affected individuals. There are different types of DJD and the most common ones include osteoarthritis (OA), post-traumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), avascular necrosis (AVN), and hip dysplasia.

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Muscle Strain (Hip)

A tear in the muscle fibres caused by a fall or direct blow to the muscle, overstretching or overuse injury, is called a strain. Muscle strains often occur in the hip region whenever a muscle contracts all of a sudden from its stretched position.

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Snapping Hip Syndrome

The hip is an important joint that helps us walk, run and jump. The ball-and-socket joint in the hip is formed between the round end of the femur (thighbone) and the cup-shaped socket of the acetabulum (part of the hip bone).

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Total Hip Joint Dislocation

An artificial replacement of a ball and socket hip joint can restore function to a hip compromised by injury or arthritis. The procedure is generally successful. However, during total hip replacement surgery, your doctor cuts through the ligamentous capsule and other soft tissues that surrounds and helps center the ball of the joint in its socket.

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Hip Avascular Necrosis

Avascular necrosis, also known as AVN and osteonecrosis, is a disease caused from inadequate blood supply to the bone which leads to bone death.

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Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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